Filming starts on ITV's first new drama to be filmed since lockdown

Filming has officially commenced on ITV’s newest series Viewpoint – the first drama to be shot for the broadcasting network since the lockdown due to the coronavirus pandemic.

Noel Clarke will star in the leading role of surveillance detective DC Martin King, with Alexandra Roach, Amy Wren, Fehinti Balogun and Catherine Tyldesley also set to appear in the show.

The five-part series has been co-created by Fleabag director Harry Bradbeer and Manhunt writer Ed Whitmore, and is described by ITV as ‘a contemporary, character-driven mystery with a seductively intimate feel’, as it explores a police surveillance instigation into a Manchester community.

In the show, DC Martin King (Noel) sets up an observation post in the home of a single mother, giving him the chance to see directly into the house of a missing primary school teacher, which she shares with her boyfriend and prime suspect Greg Sullivan.

Newly released pictures show Noel and the rest of the cast on set in Manchester, alongside crew members.

Of course, the cast and crew are making sure to keep safe to prevent the spread of Covid-19, with many seen wearing masks and maintaining social distancing.

Lucy Bedford, executive producer of the series, said: ‘Harry and Ed have crafted a compelling, tense, claustrophobic thriller that turns the spotlight on the observer rather than the observed.


‘With the incredible Noel Clarke and Alexandra Roach leading the cast, we are extremely excited to be back in production.’

It comes after Noel argued that British talent needs to be ‘nurtured’ better.


Speaking at the Edinburgh Television Festival, he said: ‘What we don’t do enough in this country is nurture our talent and build them to those places.

‘What we do is wait till they blow up somewhere else and then quickly scramble and go, “Oh look what we’ve got, we’ve got their show”, and talk about how wonderful we are at our dinners parties with our champagne.’

The actor also argued that British talent should not have to become more famous over in the US before being recognised in their home nation.

He continued: ‘What’s not happening enough is, you know people shouldn’t have to pop in America or have to be, slowly becoming successful because other people say they are good, before we in Britain embrace them and nurture them.

‘We should do that here and we don’t do that enough.’

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