Apocalyptic footage shows a tornado ripping through a resort in China

Onlookers film apocalyptic footage of a monster tornado ripping through a resort and turning the sky into pitch black in China

  • The giant column of wind struck a grassland in Inner Mongolia of northern China
  • Terrifying footage shows the freak twister hovering through a large local resort 
  • Other clips see the skies suddenly turning pitch black and covered by thick dust
  • Thirty-three people were injured and are said to have been in stable condition 

Shocked residents have captured the terrifying moment a freak tornado hovered through a large Chinese resort and engulfed the site in seconds.

Apocalyptic footage shows the twister swallowing the scenic spot in China’s northern region Inner Mongolia, turning skies pitch black and tearing apart structures.

Thirty-three people suffered different levels of injuries after the giant column of wind struck a grassland in the suburbs of Baotou city on Sunday afternoon, said the officials.

The Swan Lake Resort, located on the Xilanmuren Grassland, was severely hit by the tornado, according to the Inner Mongolia weather authorities yesterday.

Videos reportedly filmed by the resort staff show the freak twister first approaching the tourist spot before suddenly swallowing the site and covering the sky with thick dust.

A worker told Pear Video: ‘When we first saw it, it was quite small. Within ten seconds, it suddenly changed. There was yellow dust everywhere.

‘We were hiding in the bushes, and suddenly the sky turned black, like pitch black, even darker than the night sky.


Videos reportedly filmed by the resort staff members show the freak twister first approaching the tourist spot before suddenly swallowing the site and covering the sky with thick dust

‘We were really terrified. Also, maybe it was because of the air pressure, our ears were in great pain, really painful,’ the employee said.

Other clips see dozens of Mongolian yurts in the resort being torn down by the tornado, with shattered windows and destroyed furniture.

Thirty-three people were injured – including three critically – during the freak weather. They are said to have been in stable condition.

Local officials have activated an emergency response to deal with the aftermath, according to People’s Daily.

What is a tornado?

A tornado is a narrow, rapidly spinning column of air around an intense low pressure centre that reaches the ground from cumulonimbus clouds, also known as thunderstorm clouds, according to the Met Office.

Tornadoes have a narrow width, usually up to 100 metres (328 feet) but the damage can be concentrated and severe.

As they develop, funnel shaped clouds extend from the base of the cloud and when these reach the ground, a tornado is formed.

A tornado is a narrow, rapidly spinning column of air around an intense low pressure centre that reaches the ground from cumulonimbus clouds, also known as thunderstorm clouds, according to the Met Office. Pictured, a tornado over a field

Tornadoes can have wind speeds up to 483 kilometres per hour (300 miles per hour) and when they touch the ground can destroy trees and buildings in their path, throwing heavy objects like cars though the air like a Frisbee.

Tornadoes which occur over water are referred to as a waterspout and those which do not touch ground are referred to as a funnel cloud.

The highest surface wind speed ever recorded of 486 kilometres per hour (302 miles per hour) is a result of the 1999 Oklahoma tornado outbreak.

The greatest distance travelled by a single tornado was 352 kilometres (219 miles) from Ellington, Missouri to Princeton, Indiana, on 18 March 1925.

The most tornadoes in a single year were recorded in 2004. There were 1,820. 

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