Blood-soaked thug kicks volunteer police officer in the head in arrest

Dramatic moment blood-soaked thug kicks volunteer police officer in the head as he violently tries to fight arrest

  • Video shows Connor Bates, 22, running away from officers in field in Sunderland
  • Bates, whose t-shirt and hands are covered in blood, shouts abuse at the officers
  • During chase he strikes out his left leg, catching a special constable in the head
  • Bates, of Sunderland, jailed for six months for assaulting an emergency worker 

This is the dramatic footage of an incident in which a blood-soaked thug kicks a female special constable in the head as tries to fight his arrest.

The video shows the volunteer officer chasing the man, whose hands and t-shirt are covered in blood, through a field in Sunderland.

As the chase plays out, the man, who calls the pursuing officer ‘idiots’, strikes out his left leg.

His foot makes contact with the special constable’s head – leaving the officer with a painful swelling. 

He is finally brought under control by the officers, who manage to attach handcuffs to his blooded arms while he is on the ground.

The attacker Connor Bates, 22, had recently been released from prison on licence after previously attacking four police officers by spitting and kicking. 

The attacker Connor Bates, 22, had been released from prison on licence after previously attacking four police officers by spitting and kicking

Video shows the volunteer officer chasing Bates, whose hands and t-shirt are covered in blood, through a field in Sunderland

Now Bates, who also has convictions for racially aggravated offences, has been sent back to jail for six months.

What is a special constable and what are their powers?

Special constables, often referred to as ‘specials’, are volunteer police officers who police chiefs say ‘play a vital role in keeping communities safer’.

They have the same powers as regular police constables and wear a similar uniform.

They are trained to do the role via the Special Constable Learning Programme (SCLP).

According to the College of Policing, specials spend around four hours a week, or more, supporting the police to tackle crime in their community.

Metropolitan Police specials need to complete a minimum of 200 hours annually, equating to 16 hours per month.

Among other duties, their roles include, responding to 999 calls, foot and vehicle patrols, priority anti-crime initiatives, road safety initiatives, house-to-house enquiries and presenting evidence in court.

In a victim impact statement, the special constable said: ‘Even though I expect an element of resistive behaviour, I do not expect anyone to physically assault me in my line of duty.

‘I was left with pain and a bump to the rear of my head.’

Prosecutor Penny Hall told Newcastle Crown Court that police had been called to Amsterdam Road, in Sunderland, on September 6 following a report of criminal damage. 

The officers approached Bates, who matched the description of the suspect, appeared to be under the influence of drink or drugs and had blood on his hands and clothing. It is not clear whose blood it is.

Miss Hall said Bates tried to run off but was detained, while being verbally abusive, physically resisting and he was handcuffed.

She added: ‘He made reference to kicking the special constable in the head, which he then did. 

‘The defendant struck his leg out, his left leg, and kicked the special constable to the back of her head.’ 

Bates, of Saint Ignatius Close, Sunderland, who has convictions for 31 previous offences, admitted assaulting an emergency worker.

The court heard at the time of the attack Bates was out on licence from a prison sentence for offences that included attacks on four police officers.

The four officers came under attack in January, when Bates had to be taken to hospital while in custody and he spat at the officers and kicked one in the shin.

Judge Robert Spragg sentenced Bates, who has already been recalled to prison to complete his sentence for the previous offences, to six months behind bars.

Miss Hall said Bates tried to run off but was detained, while being verbally abusive, physically resisting and he was handcuffed


Prosecutor Penny Hall told Newcastle Crown Court that police had been called to Amsterdam Road, in Sunderland, on September 6 following a report of criminal damage. The officers approached Bates, who matched the description of the suspect, and who appeared to be under the influence of drink or drugs and had blood on his hands and clothing. It is not clear whose blood it is.

The judge told him: ‘This was a deliberate kick to the head area of a female officer, just trying to do her job. 

‘If you continue to assault police officers simply trying to do their job, your sentences are simply going to get longer and longer.’ 

Alec Burns, defending, said Bates ‘didn’t feel he should have been arrested’ and was not charged in relation to the offence the officers had been called out for that day.

Mr Burns added: ‘Drink is his main problem’. 

The court heard Bates has sought help in custody to deal with his drink problem, which lead to offending.

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