Jeremy Corbyn's wife promises book that 'tells the actual truth'

Now Jeremy Corbyn’s wife Laura Alvarez hints at book that ‘tells the actual truth’ after release of excerpts from new tell-all story on ex-Labour leadership

  • Laura Alvarez made the announcement to 16,600 Twitter followers on Sunday 
  • A recent book claimed Corbyn couldn’t sympathise with Jewish community
  • Mrs Alvarez said: ‘Watch this space for a book that tells the actual truth’ 
  • New book Left Out: The Inside Story of Labour under Corbyn reveals new details 
  • Aides detail infighting between key players and absence on Corbyn on decisions 
  • Advisor Andrew Murray sheds light on Corbyn’s failure to address antisemitism 
  • Reports have also been made that Corbyn infuriated MP John McDonnell when he refused to intervene in disciplinary matters against Dame Margaret Hodge  

Jeremy Corbyn’s wife has hinted at a new book about how her husband was the victim of a media slur when he was leader of the Labour Party.

Mr Corbyn’s third wife, Laura Alvarez, 51, made the announcement to her 16,600 Twitter followers on Sunday.

It is unclear whether Mrs Alvarez will be writing the book herself or whether she is simply endorsing one which is yet to be published. 

Alongside a picture of her and Mr Corbyn, 71, she wrote: ‘The mainstream press obsession with its distorted account of previous Labour leadership goes on and on.

Jeremy Corbyn’s wife (right) has promised a new book about how her husband was the victim of a media slur when he was leader of the Labour Party

Mr Corbyn’s third wife, Laura Alvarez, 51, made the announcement to her 16,600 Twitter followers on Sunday

‘Watch this space for a book that tells the actual truth will come and how we can develop our socialist policies for the Many.

‘Keep your money for a worthwhile book!’

Mrs Alvarez, a Mexican national, made the announcement just days after a new book to be released in September was revealed to contain details suggesting that Mr Corbyn couldn’t empathise with today’s ‘prosperous’ Jewish community. 

Mrs Alvarez made the announcement just days after a new book to be released in September was revealed to contain details suggesting that Mr Corbyn couldn’t empathise with today’s ‘prosperous’ Jewish community

The book, Left Out: The Inside Story of Labour under Corbyn, is due to be released on September 3 and was written by two journalists – Gabriel Pogrund and Patrick Maguire.

Mrs Alvarez’s announcement was ridiculed by many Twitter users, with one even suggesting that the book she was talking about which tells the ‘actual truth’ was in fact Left Out: The Inside Story. 

Another user mocked: ‘No doubt it will be filed under fiction in the shops.’ 

And another said: ‘It will be called, ”Not My Fault”.’

Richard Willan wrote: ‘What’s it called…. An Antisemite writes… Diary of an abject failure…Recollections of life in bitterness… There’s so many options.’

Another wrote: ‘The title could be ”Can I finish?!” in reference to Corbyn’s favourite catchphrase when being asked challenging questions by journalists and taking a long time in delivering an answer. 

Journalists Pogrund and Maguire had front row seats to Labour’s calamitous attempt to gain power. 

Former aides have revealed non-stop infighting between top strategists, Jeremy Corbyn’s anger at losing control of his diary, and his own wife’s on-screen snipes. 

According to the Times, former senior advisor Andrew Murray spoke to the authors about Mr Corbyn’s failure to deal with antisemitism in the party.  

Mrs Alvarez’s announcement was ridiculed by many Twitter users, with one even suggesting that the book she was talking about which tells the ‘actual truth’ was in fact Left Out: The Inside Story

Mr Murray, a Unite trade unionist, told them: ‘He is very empathetic Jeremy, but he’s empathetic with the poor, the disadvantaged, the migrant, the marginalised, the people at the bottom of the heap.

‘Happily, that is not the Jewish community in Britain today. He would have had massive empathy with the Jewish community in Britain in the 1930s[…]

‘But, of course, the Jewish community today is relatively prosperous.’  

Mrs Alvarez is an ex-banker and owns a coffee import business that was investigated for paying it’s farmers 93p per £10 bag in 2015.

The couple live together in a million pound house in Islington, London. 

Labour campaign chiefs feared that Jeremy Corbyn himself was sabotaging the party’s 2019 general election campaign, a new book has claimed

Andrew Murray, left, has said Corbyn (right) struggled to empathise with today’s Jewish community because they were relatively prosperous unlike back in the 1930s (file photo)

Serialised in The Sunday Times and the Times, the book details how Jeremy Corbyn ignored his chief of staff, Karie Murphy, who had suggested a visit to Auschwitz as a gesture after he faced criticism for failing to address antisemitism in the Labour Party.

It also reveals Mr Corbyn fell out with John McDonnell to the extent that the pair didn’t speak to each other ‘for months’. 

The book claims Mr McDonnell was unhappy with the disciplinary matters against Jewish MP Dame Margaret Hodge who had questioned Mr Corbyn about antisemitism in the Commons and Mr McDonnell was furious that Jeremy didn’t intervene. 

Book details how Mr Corbyn fell out with John McDonnell (pictured) to the extent that the pair didn’t speak to each other ‘for months’ over a disciplinary matter involving MP Margaret Hodge

Left Out, by Gabriel Pogrund and Patrick Maguire. claims top advisors knew the party was heading towards electoral disaster months before voters went to the polls in 2019, but were unable to stop it.

But in a damning revelation, the advisor find those present, including party chairman Ian Lavery and John Donnell’s wife Cynthia, rejected the warning that the party was losing votes to the Conservatives.

‘People in the north just won’t vote Tory,’ said Lavery, MP for Wansbeck. ‘It just won’t happen!’ 

But with just two weeks to go and YouGov putting Conservatives ahead by 359 seats to Labour’s 211, any changes including a suggestion to adopt a new campaign slogan of ‘We’re on your side’ would be futile.

The Conservatives won with 365 seats to Labour’s 202. 

Former aides have revealed non-stop infighting between top strategists, Jeremy Corbyn’s anger at losing control of his diary, and his own wife’s on screen snipes. Pictured: Corbyn with his office director Karie Murphy

Waters’ polling suggested that voters did not trust Labour on Brexit, at the time a position of having a Second Referendum on a Labour deal which some MPs could campaign against.

This convinced McDonnell, the Shadow Chancellor, that Labour had to win back pro-EU voters.

The party would therefore refrain from discussing the detail of Brexit and ‘extol the virtues of giving voters the final say via a second referendum’.

But several figures including Corbyn’s chief strategist Seumas Milne had argued against this strategy, saying that it would alienate the working class in favour of Boris Johnson’s ‘Get Brexit Done’.

The book reveals that top figures including John McDonnell knew to party was heading towards electoral disaster months before voters went to the polls in 2019, but were unable to stop it

The book suggests that those who shared Milne’s viewpoint were outmuscled over Brexit, which would become a key point of the campaign.  

As planning for the campaign got underway, McDonnell would lead discussions, with Karie Murphy, the Executive Director of Corbyn’s office sometimes stepping in.

But wary of being blamed for decisions she was unable to take, Murphy would constantly remind people in the room she was not in charge.

Seamus Milne, Corbyn’s Chief Advisor, who was a key figures in decision for the 2017 campaign, had also lowered himself from a role of decision maker. 

The lack of leadership was combined with infighting between advisors.

Policy adviser Andrew Fisher would refuse to share the draft manifesto with Milne — or anyone he regarded as being in the Milne/Murphy Brexit axis to stop their influence. 

In another example in the book, Corbyn threw what one aide described as a ‘tantrum’ when he learnt that his campaign bus was powered by a diesel engine – the sort that his own manifesto promised to outlaw by 2030

In turn Murphy closely guarded Corbyn’s diary ‘grid’, and Niall Sookoo, Labour’s director of elections, refused to share his list of key seats with Milne or Murphy. 

After four-years as Labour leader, defeat in the Brexit referendum and a draining antisemitism row, Corbyn’s energy was sapped heading into the election.

Polling in 2019 also put him as the most unpopular Labour leader of the past 45 years.

Paul Hilder, a data consultant to the campaign, warned — just as Labour MPs did after their weekly surgeries — that the leader had become a liability.

He recommended that the party deploy a broader team of spokespeople to neutralise the damage a campaign that relied on Corbyn alone would do.

But with a reduced diary and control taken away, Corbyn proved irritable.  

In one case, McDonnell proposed that Corbyn would upstage Boris Johnson by making a visit to parts of Yorkshire and the midlands affected by the floods to highlight cuts to flood defences overseen by the coalition. 

But Corbyn refused to go, citing the fact he had not been kept in the loop after his office director Murphy took control of his diary and only fed him parts at a time. 

The Labour leader became increasingly more frustrated as decisions were taken out of his hands.

In another example in the book, Corbyn threw what one aide described as a ‘tantrum’ when he learnt that his campaign bus was powered by a diesel engine – the sort that his own manifesto promised to outlaw by 2030.

In protest, he refused to use the battle bus, opting for trains and public transport. This drew ire from his team, as they struggled to reach him with constant poor phone reception while travelling the country.   

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