NYC homeless to move BACK to shelters after complaints from residents

New York City’s 10,000 homeless people will be moved BACK into shelters after a barrage of complaints about encampments in Manhattan’s wealthiest neighborhoods

  • New York City authorities are to begin the process of moving homeless people who are currently staying in hotels back into shelters
  • Although no specific timeline to complete the move was given, Mayor Bill de Blasio said that the city would start the process immediately, starting with the most vulnerable
  • It comes after complaints over issues of ‘quality of life’ from those living in the neighborhoods affected 
  • Thousands of homeless people ended up being moved into hotel rooms after fears Covid-19 was spreading fast inside crowded city shelters 
  • The complaints have led to a U-turn by the mayor who had earlier suggested that those who were homeless could remain in hotel rooms until Covid-19 vaccine had been produced which could take at least six months
  • Mayor de Blasio moved 10,000 homeless into hotels across the city to stop COVID-19 outbreaks in shelters 
  • It costs the city some $2million a night outraging residents in Manhattan who say it brought an influx of crime 

The mayor of New York, Bill de Blasio, has been forced to make a u-turn when it comes to the fate of the city’s homeless and will now move thousands who are currently residing in hotels, back into shelters. 

De Blasio has said the process will begin immediately although the mayor did not provide an end date by which time all of New York’s homeless would be out of city hotels and off the streets.

De Blasio’s promise comes amid rising tensions of various ‘quality of life’ issues from residents living close to the hotels-turned-homeless shelters.

Ramshackle encampments have popped up all over the city including here at Broadway and Franklin Street in Tribeca

A homeless encampment along Broadway and Franklin Street in lower Manhattan sits abandoned as the city grapples with numerous make shift shelters popping up over recent weeks

Some New Yorkers have blamed the rising crime rate on the homeless. However police have put that down to the release of people from jail due to COVID-19

‘As the health situation continues to improve, we’re going to start the process of figuring out where we can get homeless individuals back into safe shelter facilities and reduce the reliance on hotels,’ de Blasio said at a press conference. 

‘Hotels are certainly not where we want to be in general, and we’re going to start that process immediately.

‘On the specific quality-of-life issues, it’s incumbent upon every city agency involved to get out there and solve them,’ de Blasio said, referring to the NYPD, DHS, and the Health and Sanitation departments. 

The mayor said that the city would ‘make sure we can start to get people out of those hotels, relieve some of the pressure on those communities, but do it in a way that’s really safe for everyone involved, starting with those who are homeless.’ 

As the pandemic struck, the Department of Homeless Services (DHS) moved 10,000 homeless people from shelters into hotels. At least eight were identified as being in Hell’s Kitchen with several more along the Upper West Side areas of Manhattan.

Thousands of homeless people ended up being moved into hotel rooms after fears Covid-19 was spreading fast inside crowded city shelters. 

But it has led to a barrage of complaints from locals who are upset and concerned about aggressive panhandling, public urination and drug use, among others.

Some displaced people have been seen doing drugs, urinating and cat calling in the streets, which are free from tourists with a widespread travel ban due to the COVID-19 outbreak. 

Those living in Hell’s Kitchen told the Daily News they were accosted by homeless men 

‘I’ve instructed all of them to address these issues as they come up and make sure that neighborhood residents see that these concerns are being addressed,’ de Blasio noted. 

Thousands of homeless people ended up being moved into hotel rooms after fears Covid-19 was spreading fast inside crowded city shelters, and now a number of encampments have arisen in all parts of the city including Lower Manhattan

A woman is seen begging for money on the unusually quiet streets of Manhattan. The complaints about the rising homeless numbers have led to a U-turn by the mayor who had earlier suggested that those who were homeless could remain in hotel rooms until Covid-19 vaccine had been produced

New York’s homeless community on Fifth Avenue have used furniture and junk abandoned by wealthy people fleeing the city during the pandemic to build a sidewalk camp

Although the plastic bags may look like trash, they are the belongings of homeless people. Seen here along Fifth Avenue 

The mayor stressed that in order for the homeless to be moved out of hotels, the city would need to ensure that there is enough safe space in existing shelters. 

‘We’ll have more to say on that as the plans are more deeply developed and as we see what the health situation shows us,’ he added. 

The complaints have led to a U-turn by the mayor who had earlier suggested that those who were homeless could remain in hotel rooms until Covid-19 vaccine had been produced which is likely to take at least six months.

‘It’s a matter of months until there’s a vaccine and the crisis is over — then we’re going to bring people back into the shelter system out of those hotels,’ he said earlier in August. 

Mayor de Blasio had moved 10,000 homeless people into hotels across the city to stop COVID-19 outbreaks in shelters but many are still living out on the streets 

A woman who is part of New York’s homeless community, pictured in the East Village

Putting up the homeless in hotels is costing the city $2million a night and is outraging residents in Manhattan who say it has brought an influx of crime

There have been complaints from locals of urinating, loitering and drug-taking by homeless people on the streets

A man is pictured on Saturday, resting on the streets of the Upper West Side where hundreds of people complained 

The camp of up to 20 people on West 24th and Sixth Avenue sprung up early in the pandemic. Residents and business owners complained about the mess and chaos and said it harms their livelihoods. A homeless man is pictured on 6th Ave & 22nd St

Some New Yorkers had blamed the rising crime rate on the homeless. However the mayor had blamed it on the coronavirus pandemic and authorities have blamed it on the release of people from jail to help prevent the spread of COVID-19. 

De Blasio has moved 10,000 homeless people into hotels across the city to stop COVID-19 outbreaks in shelters.

It’s costing the city some $2million a night, which they say they’ll try to reclaim from FEMA later.

A homeless man is pictured sitting on a fire hydrant on 8th Avenue in Midtown Manhattan

New York’s homeless community outside Port Authority on 8th Avenue. Residents have complained that crime is on the up but last month, de Blasio stripped the police force of $1billion in response to Black Lives Matter protests 

All kinds of furniture  including sofas, office chairs and even fridges can be found out on the the streets in homeless camps

Homeless people setup encampments on Clarkson and Washington Street in lower Manhattan

De Blasio said for the city to get homeless people out of hotels, it has to ‘identify space that will work in our existing shelters.’

A notice shows that the city has begun a clean-up process, forcing some people to abandon their encampments

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