Wild Siberian tiger strolls in a Chinese forest farm

Chinese officials are terrified after bumping into an endangered wild tiger while inspecting a forest farm

  • The officials spotted the Siberian tiger on a recent inspection trip in China
  • Footage shows the big cat stretching its legs and walking around casually
  • It even stopped and gazed at the officials who had been paralysed with fear
  • There are only about 500 of the endangered animals left in the wild today 

A group of Chinese officials recently had a terrifying encounter on their inspection trip with a local resident – a wild Siberian tiger.

The government workers were frozen with fear after spotting the endangered big cat from their car while examining a local forest farm in north-eastern China’s Jilin Province on Monday.

But the majestic beast seemed to be nonchalant and intrigued by the visitors as footage shows the animal strolling around the road and stretching its legs in a relaxed manner.

The government workers were frozen with fear after spotting the endangered big cat from their car while examining a local farm in north-eastern China’s Jilin Province on Monday

A group of Chinese officials had a terrifying encounter on their inspection trip with an unexpected resident — a wild Siberian tiger. The picture shows the spotted big cat in Jilin

The officials, who worked at the local forestry commission, had been inspecting the Dahuanggou Forest Farm in Yanbian Korean Autonomous Prefecture, next to the border with North Korea, on November 2.

After they finished the investigation and got into their car, the officials were terrified to spot a wild Siberian tiger appearing in the woods next to the road, according to a report from the local government.

Scared but excited to see the animal, they rolled up the car windows and took some pictures before trying to drive away slowly.

But the curious big cat appeared to have been intrigued by the intruders as it followed behind the government car.

After they finished the investigation and got into their car, the officers were terrified to spot a wild Siberian tiger appearing in the woods next to the road, according to a report from the local government. The picture shows the wild tiger looking back at the terrified officials


The officials, who worked at the local forestry commission, had been inspecting the Dahuanggou Forest Farm in Yanbian Korean Autonomous Prefecture on November 2 when they were terrified to have suddenly spotted the wild Siberian tiger lurking in the woods 

As the tiger showed no intention to attack, the officials were said to have calmed down and stopped on the road to observe the beast.

In a relaxed manner, the animal is seen stretching its legs and strolling around the road, seemingly unfazed by the visitors.

While walking in front of the car, the tiger occasionally stopped and turn around while gazing at the officials.

Although the big cat appeared to have been interested in the intruders, the officials were paralysed with fear.

A female officer can be heard saying: ‘My heart is beating so fast. This is so scary.’

After a few minutes, the animal seemed to have lost interest and walked further into the woods.

While walking in front of the car, the tiger occasionally stopped and turn around while gazing at the officials. It left after a few minutes as the animal seemed to have lost interest

Siberian tigers are native to the Russian Far East and northeast China but are classed as an endangered species, with only about 500 of them left in the wild today. The file photo shows a Siberian tiger relaxing at an enclosure at Zoo Zurich, Switzerland on October 30

The spotted Siberian tiger appeared to have been in a healthy condition with a strong physique, the Yanbian government said in their report.

As the local ecosystem improved over time, a growing population of tigers and leopards in the local area had been recorded, the authorities added.

Siberian tigers are native to the Russian Far East and northeast China but are classed as an endangered species, with only about 500 of them left in the wild today.

As demand for tiger products continue, these already endangered big cats are being driven towards extinction.

Tigers are hunted as trophies and also for body parts that are used in traditional Chinese medicine.

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